Global Classrooms Conference: Act 2

19 03 2011

Onward, young delegates! Onward, points and motions! Onward, magenta business suit!

Yet another bright and early madrileña morning finds delegates and dais alike all chipper jitters pre-debate. My plenary – UNICEF 2, more commonly known as The Best Plenary – gets pointed upstairs and far to the right: the music room. My dais – my ultra-capable Director, Rapporteur, and Staff – contemplates theoretical opening ceremonies on the bongos as we alphabetically place placards. Oh my god, I think I hear the students. Are we seriously gonna be able to pull this off?

Cue the filing in of our thirty delegates, representing fifteen countries from all corners of the globe – from Sudan to Cape Verde to El Salvador to Belgium. They are looking mad sharp in their formal business attire, which lights up the geekiest debater remnants floating around in my skull. My heart she is a-thumping; the dais glances nervously at each other. Do we start? Where’s Somalia?? Who are the native English speakers here anyway???

Five minutes later and Somalia shows, and I listen to myself decisively bring down our stylin’ wooden gavel, calling the 2011 annual Madrid Global Classrooms Conference to order. Rapporteur James calls formal roll – all are present – and assures me that we have quorum. I clear my throat and prepare to center the room’s focus for the next six hours of debate and dicussion regarding our designated topic: Children in Armed Conflict. I’ve prepped a three-minute speech with a good smattering of harrowing imagery, trying to carefully walk the line between the serious nature of the topic and the early morning hour. It goes over well enough, and I proceed to open the Speakers List.

Every placard in the place shoots up – looks like these folks have been properly prompted. James and I do our best to skip around the room to construct a fair order of speakers, because once we get this ball rolling, it’s much more up to the students to determine the flow of the day’s proceedings. The U.K. begins, delivering a 1 minute and 30 second prepared speech on their country’s position – and I’m all of a sudden seeing all those practice rounds and rough drafts manifesting into calm, clear, and composed delegations. Isn’t English these kids’ second language? How can they possibly be discussing global strategy? Even barring that, how can they be speaking at length in front of a crowd of critical peers and judges? My fretting as to whether we would be able to fill the scheduled six hours of debate begins to melt away – these kids are determined to engage on a high level without pause, and I’m a mere loud-mouthed facilitator. It’s a beautiful thing.

The Speakers List moves into a series of moderated caucuses, then several extended unmoderated sessions where the students may rise and move around for more intimate and rapid exchange of ideas, plus planning of the all-important resolutions. After all, that’s the aim here; although technically the delegations are competing for awards at the end, the idea is to reward those representatives that best encourage cooperation amongst the countries. This makes things extra-sticky when the time comes to convene regarding just which delegations merit the dais’ recognition as outstanding – there’s no simple point system here, and my scrawled multi-hued notes have surely missed some key strokes of genius on the parts of various countries. Over a greedily scarfed lunch well-within illicit proximity to the priceless bongos, we manage to come to consensus. Miraculously, so do the quibbling delegations during the final round of debate: we collectively pass two forward-thinking, well-written resolutions. It’s not a mandatory part of the day’s events, but it feels productive; we done good.

Buses zip everyone back to the hoity-toity Asemblea, where the chairs of each plenary are ushered into a prominent position within the horseshoes of seats. After a few deservedly sappy wrap-up speeches from members of the Comunidad de Madrid and representatives from the American Embassy, the spotlight shines to us to present the awards. My quickly-scribbled ditty:

The Chair would like the recognize the honorable delegates from UNICEF Plenary 2, UNICEF Plenary 2, you do NOT have the floor – sorry – but you HAVE impressed me! I don’t believe I’ve ever enjoyed six hours of discussion regarding theoretical trade embargoes and international monetary funds so much as today. Together, we have passed two – count-em-two! – outstanding resolutions to combat the international issue of children in armed conflict, and it absolutely would not have been possible without your preparedness and professionalism. I could not possibly be more proud.

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6 responses

19 03 2011
linda

Janel – this is outstanding work! I remember discussing this with you way back when after you heard this was the part of Fulbright that everyone dreaded! Clearly, you were made to do this. Your “quickly scrawled ditty” literally brought tears to my eyes (also the pic of you in your power suit!). So proud.

19 03 2011
contomates

aww, thanks momma. it was a total blast on my part; my kids reported back that they “had more fun than anticipated” too.

21 03 2011
Rich

I love it too. What a great testimonial that you’ve got good students and that you’re reaching them in a meaningful way. Way to go – I’m proud too.

24 03 2011
Alice

Janel, this program is awesome. You highly succeeded and I,m so very proud.

25 03 2011
contomates

thanks so much!! it’s definitely been the highlight of my english auxiliar experience thus far. stay tuned for another exciting model UN update very soon…

7 06 2011
((vamos lo mas de prisa posible)) « con tomates

[…] probably accounts for the most notable “event” as such. My work with the model United Nations program through Fulbright in Madrid afforded me a shot at one of the two available spots as designated […]

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